M G Edible Oil Consulting, Inc

Case Studies


#1: Blending Cottonseed Oil for Potato Chips

#2: Special Processing of Soybean Oil

#3: Trans Fat Free Shortening for Baking & Frying

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A  North American company wanted to reduce the cost of frying oil for  potato chips. The primary cost component for potato chips is cottonseed  oil. Using 100% cottonseed oil is expensive. To reduce costs, a blend of  cottonseed and soybean oil was contemplated. However, American  consumers do not like potato chips fried in an oil blend containing even  a small amount of soybean oil.  MG  Edible Oil Consulting implemented special processing steps to produce  soybean oil that could be blended up to 50% in cottonseed oil without  compromising on the taste of potato chips. This resulted in huge savings  for the company.  

A  large corporation in North America wanted to blend soybean oil with  liquid cottonseed oil to produce fried potato chips. Normally, soybean  oil is known to develop ‘beany’, grassy or fishy flavor in fried potato  chips. This occurs due to two reasons:   

  1. The crude soybean oil may contain certain precursors that cannot be completely removed from the oil through processing
  2. Certain precursors are produced in the oil during processing and remain in the oil even after the oil is fully processed.

MG  Edible Oil recommended that soybeans be crushed and the crude oil be  processed through special treatment. This was done at a major oil  processing plant in North America. The specially processed soybean oil  was blended at 25-50 per cent into cottonseed oil. The resultant oil did  not develop any off flavor in fried potato chips.  

Trans  fatty acid is one of the most important current issues in the field of  vegetable oil technology. MG Edible used modified fatty acid soybean oil  from a multinational company in the U.S., shortenings were made for  baking and frying French fries.  These  shortenings were Trans fat free. The products made with these  shortenings were equal to those made with the shortenings obtained  through the conventional hydrogenation process.  

#1: Blending Cottonseed Oil for Potato Chips

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A  North American company wanted to reduce the cost of frying oil for  potato chips. The primary cost component for potato chips is cottonseed  oil. Using 100% cottonseed oil is expensive. To reduce costs, a blend of  cottonseed and soybean oil was contemplated. However, American  consumers do not like potato chips fried in an oil blend containing even  a small amount of soybean oil.  MG  Edible Oil Consulting implemented special processing steps to produce  soybean oil that could be blended up to 50% in cottonseed oil without  compromising on the taste of potato chips. This resulted in huge savings  for the company.  

#2: Special Processing of Soybean Oil

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A  large corporation in North America wanted to blend soybean oil with  liquid cottonseed oil to produce fried potato chips. Normally, soybean  oil is known to develop ‘beany’, grassy or fishy flavor in fried potato  chips. This occurs due to two reasons:   

  1. The crude soybean oil may contain certain precursors that cannot be completely removed from the oil through processing
  2. Certain precursors are produced in the oil during processing and remain in the oil even after the oil is fully processed.

MG  Edible Oil recommended that soybeans be crushed and the crude oil be  processed through special treatment. This was done at a major oil  processing plant in North America. The specially processed soybean oil  was blended at 25-50 per cent into cottonseed oil. The resultant oil did  not develop any off flavor in fried potato chips.  

#3: Trans Fat Free Shortening for Baking & Frying

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Trans  fatty acid is one of the most important current issues in the field of  vegetable oil technology. MG Edible used modified fatty acid soybean oil  from a multinational company in the U.S., shortenings were made for  baking and frying French fries.  These  shortenings were Trans fat free. The products made with these  shortenings were equal to those made with the shortenings obtained  through the conventional hydrogenation process.